We continue with our suggestions of what you and the kids can do  while waiting to embark on their exciting secondary school journey. This time we focus on what to do in sunny Singapore.

learn-897410_640

  • On rainy days or when it’s too hot to go outside, let them catch up on some movies they’ve missed. Many movies have numerous learning points that can be harnessed. For example, if they haven’t already watched San Andreas which aired in cinemas in 2015, get them to watch it and then to do some research to find out more about earthquakes and whether the portrayal in the movie was accurate. They will thank you for it when they learn about Plate Tectonics in secondary school and can offer insights and information that their peers don’t have or don’t know about.
  • If your child is still in the grip of the Pokemon Go craze, take them on a day trip to catch ‘em all in the great outdoors. Tell them the only condition is that you will not be visiting any shopping malls in your quest. While you are at it, why not leave the car at home and hop on to the MRT or take the bus? Seize this opportunity to share with them what public transport was like when you were their age.
  • Acquaint your child with the natural surroundings and Singapore’s heritage before the fast pace of development make many of these just a memory.
  1. Take a guided walk through MacRitchie Reservoir, Sisters Island and Kranji to learn about our local flora and fauna

(https://lovemacritchie.wordpress.com/love-macritchie-walks/)

(https://www.nparks.gov.sg/gardens-parks-and-nature/parks-and-nature- reserves/sisters-islands-marine-park/intertidal-guided-walk)

(https://www.nparks.gov.sg/gardens-parks-and-nature/parks-and-nature-reserves/kranji-marshes/guided-walks)

  1. Visit sites that commemorate the brave deeds of the men and women who fought during World War 2.

(http://www.changimuseum.sg/)

(http://www.nhb.gov.sg/museums/reflections-at-bukit-chandu)

  • If your children love to read, take them to the library and let them loose. Encourage them to read beyond what they normally do and introduce them to the classics or poetry or even Shakespeare and see them fly into different realms. If they don’t particularly like to read, a good place to start would be to get them to read books that have been made into movies because it’s much easier for them to visualise what they are reading. Many a time they will realise that the book version is far more compelling than the movie and that could start them on a life-long love affair with reading.
Advertisements